Building stones used in Liverpool and Cheshire (click image for larger view and explanation) Building stone in the crypt of Catholic cathedral, Liverpool. The granite used in this building shows flow orientation of the feldspar phenocysts and cross cutting veins. Polished slab (cut as a facing stone) in the Pitcher laboratory, Earth & Ocean Sciences Dept., Liverpool University. The granite shown in these images shows flow orientation of feldspar phenocysts and xenoliths. Building stone used in boundary walls of the University of Liverpool. Permo -Triassic sandstone blocks in a wall in Brownlow Street; details of blocks showing various sedimentary structures. These blocks of sandstone show different types of bedding. Look for laminations, planar bedding, cross bedding, convolute lamination. Try and work out the way-up direction shown in these blocks. Building stones used in the Harold Cohen Library, Liverpool University. The building stone here is Portland Stone (a Jurassic limestone). Part of this rock is best described as a bioclastic limestone. Other parts are oolitic limestone. This building stone has been weathered and where this has happened details of the bioclasts (fossil fragments) can be picked out. Facing stone used in the Physics Building, Liverpool University. Rock is used in this building as a facing stone: a thin rock layer used for ornament and/or protection as an outer layer of stone on a brick wall. The rock is Carboniferous Limestone. It is a crinoidal limestone and it shows the following: fossils (crinoids, brachiopods, corals), geopetal structures and stylolites. Facing stone used on the Oceanography/Maths Building, Liverpool University. This facing stone is the rock called serpentinite. This rock shows faults and you can see displacements of the veins in the rock. Facing stone used on the Engineering Building, Liverpool University. Volcani-clastic rocks (Borrowdale Volcanics) showing details of bedding. Stone used for paving or as a flagstones, Chester. These paving slabs or flagstones are made of mica-rich sandstone. The surfaces of these slabs show vertical burrows and primary current lineations. Stone used for paving or as a flagstone, Little Moreton Hall, Cheshire. This flagstone is mica-rich sandstone. There are ripple marks on the surface of this slab. .
BUILDING STONES
© University of Liverpool, Department of Earth, Ocean & Ecological Sciences 2013
Earth, Ocean & Ecological Sciences Granite showing flow orientation of phenocysts & a cross cutting vein Granite showing flow orientation of phenocysts Granite showing flow orientation of phenocysts & a cross cutting vein Granite (Shap granite) showing flow orientation of phenocysts Granite (Shap granite) showing phenocrysts Granite (Shap granite) showing flow orientation of phenocysts and xenoliths Jurassic bioclastic limestone (Portland Stone) showing evidence of  weathering Jurassic oolitic limestone (Portland Stone) showing evidence of weathering Carboniferous crinoidal limestone showing  stylolites Carboniferous crinoidal limestone; the crinoids show geopetal structures Carboniferous crinoidal limestone + coral & brachiopods Faulted serpentinite; faults shown by vein displacements Vertical burrows in a mica-rich sandstone  Primary current lineations in a mica-rich sandstone Ripple marked surface on mica-rich sandstone
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